Courtney Barnett’s New Single Has Her Brewing Her Own Coffee

Courtney Barnett names her songs things like “Avant Gardener” and calls her backing band “The Courtney Barnetts.” She’s a clever girl. In 2013, her silly word play succeeded in accelerating her soothing, monotone drone of a voice across the twangy landscapes of The Double EP: A Sea of Split Peas. The double EP blew up, sending Courtney Barnett and the Courtney Barnetts touring around the world and off towards developing their first true “album.”

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Last week Ms. Barnett dropped her grooviest and homiest little track to date, “Depreston,” the second single off her highly anticipated Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit. With a guitar tone that sounds borrowed from Mac Demarco’s 2, “Depreston” has Barnett experimenting sonically, and hints that she isn’t going to hold back from treading new ground.

“Depreston” features Barnett telling a story about house hunting in some undistinguished suburb chock-full of low crime-rates and cul-de-sacs, just far enough out the city to “feel depressing.” The tune begins with her trying to convince herself that she needs to grow up and settle down as she weighs the advantage of brewing her own coffee versus buying fancy lattes from baristas. But soon she finds herself standing in an open-house, contemplating the implications of death, grief, and regrowth after discovering the fate of the home’s previous owner. Barnett sings “If you’ve got a spare half a million, you could knock it down and start rebuildin’” until her incredibly Australian drawl submerges itself into the oceanic groove. Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit is due out March 24th on Mom + Pop.

I Love You, “I Love You, Honeybear”

Father John Misty. Probably a fitting moniker for a man who claims to have “discovered” himself while sitting naked, atop an oak tree. Josh Tillman is the real name of the shroomed-out, van-driving, gentleman we came to love in 2012 when he released his hilarious, honky-tonkish debut, Fear Fun.

Father John Misty's second album, "I Love You, Honeybear," available as of February 10th.
Father John Misty’s second album, “I Love You, Honeybear,” released February 10th.

 

With his first album as Father John Misty, Tillman came out unadulterated and charmingly honest, a man free of any obligation to take himself seriously. Before that, he was only known as the unenthusiastic drummer of Fleet Foxes, who opened his own shows as folk singer, J. Tillman playing morbidly depressing songs that, frankly, weren’t very good. But Fear Fun marked a transformation for the man. He cast himself as a comedian doing standup at a rock n’ roll concert, and somehow he fit the role. It seemed as if he had finally found what would make his music brilliant: his sense of humor. Something he could surely stick to.

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Understanding the Decemberists in 13 Songs

The Decemberists are nothing less than the band that got me into indie rock, albeit in a very non-indie way: back in January of 2009, I was watching a rerun of one of my favorite episodes of How I Met Your Mother, “Ted Mosby, Architect”. During the episode’s denouement, as Ted Mosby walks the streets of New York and muses on his relationship woes, the seminal Decemberists’ track “Here I Dreamt I Was an Architect” plays. I’d seen the episode before, but something inside me told me to look up the song this time — and just a month later I had purchased all five of the Decemberists’ LPs (including the newly released The Hazards of Love) and was at the beginning of a relationship that I still find myself in. They’ve provided the soundtrack of my past 6 years, good and bad, and with their new album What a Terrible World, What a Beautiful World there’s no better time to fall in love with them again — or for the very first time.

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Humble Opinion on Modest Mouse

 

Cover art for upcoming Modest Mouse album
Cover art for upcoming Modest Mouse album

Over the past month, Modest Mouse has released two singles off of their highly anticipated upcoming album, Strangers to Ourselves. It has been nearly eight years since the release of their last album, We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank, which was either Modest Mouse’s best album or worse album depending on who you ask. Naturally, there was a lot of excitement and anxiety over the direction Modest Mouse would take with this next album, which warrants us to take a closer look at the releases.

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